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Zoltán Kodály

"What We're Listening To" - Zoltán Kodály's Duo for Violin and Cello

Zoltán Kodály (1882 -1967) was a famous Hungarian composer, ethnomusicologist and pedagogue who was known internationally for having created the Kodály Method of teaching music.                                                                                                                                                Kodály was born in Kecskemét, Hungary (formely Austria) and learned to play the violin as a child. In 1902 he began studying composition at a university in Budapest and in 1905 he traveled to remote Hungarian villages to collect folk songs and record them on phonograph cylinders. He wrote a thesis titled: “Strophic Construction in Hungarian Folksong. “ A year later he met and befriended Béla Bartók, whom he introduce to his method in collecting folk songs and with him published editions of folk songs between 1906 and 1921.
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LIVS Smithtown Grand Opening Celebration

Greetings from The Long Island Violin Shop!

We invite you to join us for our 

Grand Opening Celebration

at our new Smithtown location.

Our new store is located at 23 Main Street in Smithtown, NY.

The Celebration will take place

Friday October 19thfrom 4:30 to 6:30pm.

Ribbon Cutting Ceremony at 5pm.
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John Rutter

"What We're Listening To" - John Rutter's Suite for Strings

John Rutter is a British composer. He attended and then served as director of music at Clare College in Cambridge and led the choir to international prominence. In 1980, Rutter was made an honorary Fellow of Westminster Choir College in Princeton, New Jersey, and in 1981 he founded the Cambridge Singers. He was also named Fellow of the Guild of Church Musicians and received a Lambert Doctorate of Music from the Archbishop of Canterbury.
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Henryk Wieniawski

"What We're Listening To" - Wieniawski Violin Concerto No. 2 in D Minor

Henryk WieniawskiHenryk Wieniawski was a Polish violinist and composer. He began playing the violin when he was young and was admitted to the Paris Conservatoire at age nine, despite not being French. After graduating from the Conservatoire, he toured extensively and published his first piece of music at the age of twelve. He moved to St. Petersburg in his mid-twenties, where he taught violin and performed as well. A decade later, he took a position as a violin professor in Brussels. Throughout his career as a composer, he wrote many works for violin, including a book of 10 études that has become a standard work of study for aspiring violinists. His legacy lives on in many ways, including a violin competition named for him, the International Henryk Wieniawski Violin Competition.
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Master Violin Maker Charles Rufino posing with violin in his shop

The Art and Lore of the Violin: A Presentation by Charles Rufino

The Art and Lore of the Violin
A Presentation by Charles Rufino
Thursday, August 2nd, 7pm
at The South Huntington Public Library
Master Violin Maker Charles Rufino has delighted audiences for years with his witty and enlightening illustrated lecture, The Art and Lore of the Violin, a  journey through time and cultural history, illuminating the early history of the violin and how its development interacted with social and cultural forces. Many rare, beautiful and hard-to-find images illustrate the development of the King of Instruments and provide iconographic evidence of its growth. Mr. Rufino brings his lifelong study and passion for the violin, music, and art to his presentation, which is sure to delight audiences of all ages.

This presentation is free of charge and will be open to the public, no registration required. For more details, please visit the South Huntington Public Library web page at: www.shpl.org.
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Assortment of Thomastik Infeld Strings

String Workshop & Sales Event at the LIVS!

STRING WORKSHOP AND SALES EVENT Wednesday, August 15th from 5:30 to 7:30 at the LIVS 8 Elm Street Huntington, NY 11743   Have you ever wanted to try out strings before you buy them? If yes then DON'T MISS THIS EVENT! The Long...

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Ernest Bloch

"What We're Listening To" - Ernest Bloch - Schelomo: Rhapsodie Hébraïque for Violoncello and Orchestra

On July 24th, we will celebrate the 136th birthday of Swiss composer Ernest Bloch! Bloch was a violinist from the age of nine, studying in Brussels with teachers such as Eugène Ysaÿe. Soon after, he began his composition studies and published his first work, Historiettes au Crépuscule for mezzo-soprano voice and piano, in 1903. However, he soon found that his Jewish roots distinctively resonated within him in his musical endeavors. Bloch composed a number of works that have come to be known as his “Jewish Cycle”. These pieces now constitute some of his most well-known works since these compositions contain tremendous forces of expression and personal significance. Bloch admitted, at one point, that he could not distinguish within his music where his Jewish influences ended and where his self began.

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Review of Charles Rufino's Masterclass: "Instrument Repair for the String Educator"

Review of Charles Rufino's Masterclass: "Instrument Repair for the String Educator"

"As teachers, we have to be prepared for all kinds of unthinkable situations and be able to effectively react in the moment! As string teachers, add the unthinkable instrument damages to that list! I highly recommend taking this summer course if you are interested in string instrument repairs, and I especially recommend it to sharpen your know-how skills to be able to fix problems on the fly! From strings breaking to seams coming unglued, all aspects of making the instruments playable again will be covered and this course is time well spent with a very enjoyable group of colleagues!" - Catherine Colquhoun - Westbury Middle School Orchestra Director
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Mikail Glinka

Mikail Glinka - Sonata for Viola and Piano

Mikhail Glinka is considered the fountainhead 
of Russian classical music, and the first Russian composer to gain widespread recognition in his own country. As a child, he was raised by his over-protective grandmother and was confined to her room, and therefore developed a sickly disposition. The only music he heard during his confinement was the sound of strident church bells and improvisatory peasant choirs. Both of these used unconventional harmonies, which later freed Glinka to break free from the Western tradition of consonant harmony.
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